Ouya — the open source, Android powered console — is a go

Yesterday I talked about “The Future of Handheld Gaming” wherein I said quite definitively that phone-gaming is a bit of a fad and true handheld gaming can (and hopefully will, survive).

Somewhat related to that is the news that Ouya — the open source console powered by Android — pulled $8.6 million dollars via Kickstarter. They’ve lined up some companies, too, and well, are now accepting pre-orders. This is huge news, of course: while the Vita has been stumbling its way through cross-play gaming, with an Android console that becomes a huge reality — taking games with you on your cell phone seems to be a real possibility.

The only question is, will developers jump for it?

Katsuhiro Harada — Mr. Tekken — recently said that he believes that a one-console future is the way to go, and while that would make things a cinch for devs and likely help the big three settle their differences, it at one point seemed unlikely. I remember imagining as a kid that that would be the future… I kind of doubt it these days, but with projects like Ouya going big, Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft are going to have to find a way to compete. Ouya will likely feature tons of free games — courtesy of Android’s already huge library — as well as premium content designed for the Ouya itself. Something open source like this will be ripe for piracy, too —  SNES/NES/GB roms on your Android powered console? Probably.

God knows console sales have been interesting over the last little while, but with a retail price that pretty much trounces the competition, not to mention the 3DS and Vita, I’d be worried if I was one of the big three.

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Gamer Entitlement and the Myth of Ownership

Art is a tricky damn thing. It’s almost impossible to define, to begin with, and it’s pretty damn hard to decide who the owner ever is. I mean, sure, there’s often the original piece of art, like with a painting or a fresco or a sculpture or whatever. Things get much more complicated when you consider other mediums like music, where that piece of art, be it Beethoven or the Beatles, can be recreated and redone (or even duplicated) by a third party. Read the rest of this entry »